Weekend Web for July 22, 2013

Weekly Web roundup for deliciousbythebay.com

Weekly Web roundup for deliciousbythebay.com

Weekend Web

Are vitamins and minerals worth the money? How does constant commentary help people lose weight? It doesn’t. And, finally, some wise words from The Office’s Mindy Kaling. 

 

From The Atlantic: The Vitamin Myth: Why We Think We Need Supplements

 

Let's see some studies about food-based supplementation rather than just the toxic synthetic stuff we know already. Courtesy of The Atlantic.

Let’s see some studies about food-based supplementation rather than just the toxic synthetic stuff we know already. Courtesy of The Atlantic.

Author Paul Offitt writes, “Nutrition experts contend that all we need is what’s typically found in a routine diet. Industry representatives, backed by a fascinating history, argue that foods don’t contain enough, and we need supplements. Fortunately, many excellent studies have now resolved the issue.” Or have they? Linus Pauling’s story is sad, but I as a minor researcher take issue with one point: The author of this article argues that the reason those vitamin-takers studied were less healthy than non-takers is that “free radicals aren’t as evil as advertised.” Maybe, but one thing he doesn’t take into account is that there is a marked difference between the way a body processes *synthetic* vitamins and the way it processes food-based nutrients. A person eating a standard American diet (one that is high in processed foods and low in fruits and vegetables) would do well to supplement with a good food-based multi (since, as he writes, people who consume higher amounts of antioxidants live longer and have lower risks of cancer and heart disease). The studies he references are all concerning synthetic supplements. Personally, I think getting nutrients from food is the way to go, but not everyone has a fantastic diet. He writes that people who eat antioxidants are healthier, but doesn’t at all address that some supplements are food-based (and thus are supplements and not food). Both come in pill form and one (the food-based pill) can actually increase health. I agree with the idea that mega-dosing to prohibit certain diseases is unsound. I disagree that supplementation is wholly unwise, given predominant diet and lifestyle factors, such as fat- and sun aversion. Read more here.

 

I am so sick of the airplane argument that I hate to even post this picture, courtesy of NPR.org

I am so sick of the airplane argument that I hate to even post this picture, courtesy of NPR.org

From NPR.org, Hating On Fat People Just Makes Them Fatter

By Deborah Franklin Don’t try to pretend your gibes and judgments of the overweight people in your life are for their own good…’People often rationalize that it’s OK to discriminate based on weight because it will motivate the victim to lose pounds,’ Angelina Sutin, a psychologist at the Florida State College of Medicine in Tallahassee, tells Shots. ‘But our findings suggest the opposite.’” Do we really need another study to prove that fat-bashing doesn’t help people who want to lose weight? Read the comments. We do.

Gorgeous and funny Mindy Kaling, courtesy of JustJarod.com

Gorgeous and funny Mindy Kaling, courtesy of JustJarod.com

To cleanse your palate from all the hate in those comments, how about some much-needed wisdom from the gorgeous and hilarious Mindy Kaling in her 2011 book, Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me?: If someone called me chubby, it would no longer be something that kept me up late at night. Being called fat is not like being called stupid or unfunny, which is the worst thing you could ever say to me. Do I envy Jennifer Hudson for being able to lose all that weight and look smokin’ hot? Of course, yes. Do I sometimes look at Gisele Bundchen and wonder how awesome life would be if I never had to wear Spanx? Duh, of course. That’s kind of the point of Gisele Bundchen. And maybe I will, once or twice, for a very short period of time. But on the list of things I want to do in my lifetime, that’s not near the top. I mean, it’s not near the bottom either. I’d say it’s right above “Learn to drive a vespa,” but several notches below “film a chase scene for a movie.”

With that I’ll wish you a sweet, happy weekend.

-Kirsten

Kirsten Quint Fairbanks is health coach and wellness practice owner who lives happily, works gratefully, home-schools secularly, dances inexpertly, and cooks traditionally in the San Francisco Bay Area. She offers in-person and remote health coaching anywhere and holistic skincare in downtown San Francisco. Read more about her here.

 

 

With that I’ll wish you a sweet, happy weekend.

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